Prostate Cancer Statistics And Survival Rates

Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent cancer¹ among men in the United States.

The prostate gland plays an essential role in the production of seminal fluid. Cancer in the prostate often develops slowly and remains inside the gland. It can be more aggressive in some cases, which means it develops fast and can spread beyond the prostate. 

Luckily, prostate cancer typically has a favorable prognosis. It is very curable in its early stages, and many people are treated effectively.

Prevalence

Prostate cancer is a serious disease that impacts thousands of middle-aged or older men each year. Around 60%² of prostate cancer cases are in men over 65 years old. 

According to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, one in eight men³ will receive a prostate cancer diagnosis in their lifetime.

Prostate cancer cases rose in the late 1980s, and early 1990s as screening became more accessible and available with the PSA test. However, from 2013 to 2017, incidences rates have largely remained steady.

What is the current lifetime risk of developing prostate cancer?

The estimated lifetime risk of getting prostate cancer is about 16.7%⁴, translating to roughly one in six men. 

What country has the highest rate of prostate cancer?

According to a 2018 study by the World Cancer Research Fund⁵, Guadeloupe has the highest rate of prostate cancer, followed by Martinique. Other countries with high rates include: 

  • Ireland

  • Barbados

  • Estonia

  • Norway

  • Sweden

  • Puerto Rico

  • France

Which countries have the lowest rate of prostate cancer?

While the highest incidences of prostate cancer⁶ occur in Western Europe, Australia, and North America, the lowest incidences are in the Far East and on the Indian subcontinent.

Who is at risk

Some men are at a higher risk of getting prostate cancer than others. Generally, the chances increase with age, particularly after age 50. This is why you should start being screened once you hit age 50. 

Other risk factors for the disease include:

  • Race: African American men are twice as likely to get prostate cancer as white men. Several studies reveal that the number of new Black men diagnosed is nearly 80% higher⁷ than those diagnosed in white men.

  • Family history of prostate cancer: If you have a family member, either a brother or a father, diagnosed with prostate cancer, especially at a relatively early age, you are at a higher risk of developing one.

  • Family history of breast and ovarian cancer: A family history of breast and ovarian cancer is associated with an inherited BRCA gene mutation that could trigger prostate cancer.

  • Diet: A high-fat diet and obesity increase your chances of developing the disease.

Five-year survival rate

The five-year survival rate represents the percentage of people that live at least five years after their prostate cancer is diagnosed. 

The five-year survival rate for people with prostate cancer is 98%⁸. The ten-year survival rate is also 98%.

Importantly, if prostate cancer is detected early when the disease is only in the prostate, your five-year survival rate is nearly 100%. However, when prostate cancer has spread to other regions of the body, the five-year survival rate drops to 30%. 

Survival rate by cancer stage

  • Localized or stage I: nearly 100%

  • Regional or stage II: nearly 100%

  • Distant or stage III: 30%

  • Distant or stage IIII: 28%

This is based on survival statistics from the SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) database and maintained by the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Survival rate by age 

The survival rate of prostate cancer is 91% in men aged 15-49⁹. It reaches its highest rate at 94% in 60-69-year-olds. After that, the survival rate drops to 66% for 80-99-year-olds.

Have you considered clinical trials for Prostate cancer?

We make it easy for you to participate in a clinical trial for Prostate cancer, and get access to the latest treatments not yet widely available - and be a part of finding a cure.

Mortality rates

According to data from the CDC, about 211,894 new cases of prostate cancer¹⁰ were diagnosed in 2018. The number of men who died from prostate cancer in that same year was 31,488.

Statistics like this show prostate cancer typically has a favorable prognosis. It is very curable in its early stages, and many people are treated effectively.

Recurrence rate

Even after your cancer has been treated, there is a risk it may return. Studies reveal between 20 to 30% of prostate cancer cases¹¹ relapse after the five-year mark.

This risk is mainly determined by how aggressive your type of prostate cancer is and its stage

Prevention

There are no established procedures for preventing prostate cancer. However, some experts believe a healthy diet of low fats, high vegetables, and fruits can help reduce the risks of developing the disease.

Importantly, routine screening with a PSA blood test and physical examination can help detect prostate cancer at an early stage. 

Learn more about steps you can take today to help prevent prostate cancer. 

The lowdown 

How prostate cancer will affect you depends on several factors such as your cancer stage, available treatment options, general health, PSA level, and more. 

However, although prostate cancer is considered a severe disease, most men diagnosed with the disease don't die from it. 

In general, the earlier prostate cancer is detected, the greater the chance of successful treatment. If you have any questions about prostate cancer or believe you are experiencing symptoms, don't hesitate to speak with your doctor. 

  1. Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer | American Cancer Society

  2. Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer | American Cancer Society

  3. What is Prostate Cancer | Prostate Cancer Foundation

  4. Prostate Cancer in Elderly Men (2008)

  5. Prostate Cancer Statistics | World Cancer Research Fund

  6. Dietary habits and prostate cancer detection: a case–control study (2008)

  7. Prostate Cancer Statistics | Cancer.Net

  8. Prostate Cancer Statistics | Cancer.Net

  9. Prostate Cancer Survival Statistics | Cancer Research UK

  10. U.S. Cancer Statistics Prostate Cancer Stat Bite | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

  11. Prostate Cancer Prognosis | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Have you considered clinical trials for Prostate cancer?

We make it easy for you to participate in a clinical trial for Prostate cancer, and get access to the latest treatments not yet widely available - and be a part of finding a cure.

Joining community groups and exercise programs for my condition made me feel empowered – but I want to be part of finding a cure.
Peter, 64

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